Thomas Jefferson to Isaac Shelby, 28 June 1793

To Isaac Shelby

Sir

The bearer hereof Mr. Michaud is a citizen of the French republic who has resided several years in the US. as the Conductor of a botanical establishment belonging to the French1 nation. He is a man of science and merit, and goes to Kentuckey in pursuit of objects of Natural history and botany, to augment2 the literary acquirements of the two republicks. Mr. Genet the Minister of France here, having expressed to me3 his esteem for Mr. Michaud and good opinion of him, and his wish that he should be made known to you, I take the liberty of recommending him to your notice, your counsels, and good offices.4 His character here persuades me they will be worthily bestowed on him, and that your5 further knowlege of him will justify6 the liberty I take of making him known to you. This will the more need7 justification, as I have not the honor of being personally known to you myself.8 This9 circumstance however has not prevented my entertaining for you those sentiments of esteem and respect which your10 character is entitled to inspire, and which I beg leave to tender you, with sincere assurances of attachment and regard from11 Your Excellency's Most obedt & most humble servt

PrC (DLC); incorporating some revisions made to Dft on 5 July 1793; at foot of text: “H.E. Governr. Shelby.” Dft (DLC); variant text with penciled emendations added on 5 July 1793. PrC (DLC); lacks penciled emendations. Tr (DLC); 19th-century copy of final PrC.

  1. Word interlined in pencil in Dft.
  2. Dft: “enrich.”
  3. Preceding two words not in Dft.
  4. In Dft TJ originally wrote “I take the liberty of making this gentleman known to you, and of recommending him to your notice, your counsels and good offices, as they may respect both his person and pursuits.” He subsequently revised the entire sentence in pencil to read “Mr. Genet the Min. of Fr. here having expressed his esteem for and confidence in Mr. Michaud and his wish that he should be made known to you, I take the liberty of recommending him to your notice, your counsels and good offices.”
  5. Sentence to this point interlined in pencil in Dft in place of “I am persuaded your.”
  6. Here in Dft TJ bracketed “any services you may render him, and” for deletion in pencil.
  7. In Dft TJ first wrote “It will the more require” before altering the passage in pencil to read as above.
  8. Word interlined in pencil in Dft.
  9. Sentence to this point in Dft reads: “But this.”
  10. Here in Dft TJ marked “own” for deletion in pencil.
  11. In Dft TJ originally wrote “and of which I beg permission to assure you; being with great respect” before revising the passage in pencil to read as above.